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  • February 20, 2016
    kelsay

    Yellow Birch

    One of my favorite trees in the winter is Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis). The bark is not white like white birch or yellow like the name would suggest, but cherry like that exfoliates with copper and gray with white lentils. The bark becomes brown and plated as it gets older.

  • June 01, 2015
    kelsay

    The Birds Are Coming...

    Spring is but a fridge date on the calender, but it is coming and so are the birds. All over Illinois the landscape is changing with homes, roads, removed wind rows and general toppling of habitat and food sources for our welcomed feathery trespassers. Now for those of us that are a bit lucky and have habitat existing in our yards, a simple addition of key species and water will do the job. But those that have to start from scratch are in a tricky spot: “Where do I begin???”

  • June 24, 2013
    kelsay

    Large Breed Companion

    We often have customers visit the nursery and, most recently, bloggers who are planning landscaping projects but wonder how they’ll keep their large breed companions from destroying all their hard work.  I’m not an authority, but I would like to share some ideas that work for Lucy and I.

  • March 26, 2013
    kelsay

    Plant Sales, Pre-Order Dates and a Native Plant Class for 2013

    Possibility Place has just updated the News & Events page with 2013 dates for pre-orders and plant sales. We're also happy to announce our Forest Preserve District of DuPage County: Landscaping with Native Plants Class which will be held in Oak Brook on Saturday, April 20, from 1:30–3:30 PM.

  • December 05, 2012
    admin

    Possibility Place vs Conventional Planting with H.O.P.E.

    In November of 2012 we had students from the H.O.P.E. (Horticultural Occupational & Professional Experience) program visit Possibility Place. The focus of the program is to expose college age students to different aspects of the horticultural industry. They visit and work at a different nursery/garden center for two days a month for six months. It is hoped that at each stop they learn a little more about what it takes to be a plant professional.

  • October 20, 2012
    kelsay

    Weather Adds to the Challenge

    Some of you may have read my post last fall about collecting acorns and all the idiosyncrasies of the different types of oaks as well as the other consumers I have to contend with to get my job as propagator done. Well, here I am starting my fourth year at Possibility Place Nursery and I have another set of circumstances to make my job more challenging and interesting: a too-mild winter followed by one of the driest springs and hottest summers on record.

  • March 22, 2012
    kelsay

    Down and Dirty: Learning isn’t always tidy!

    This April 14th from 8:30 AM to Noon we are having another of our hands-on learning experiences. It's not one of those mamby-pamby classes, either—we’re sticking you out in the weather under the same conditions that we work in every day! It will be dirty, possibly wet and loads of fun for those of us that love plants. You’ll even go home with two flats of plugs! So if you’re interested please CALL the office at 708-534-3988 to sign up. The flier is posted below and cost will be $60.00 per person. Not a bad price for a lot of learning and plants (and a donut or two)!

  • February 21, 2012
    kelsay

    From Acorns to Oak Trees

    The process of growing trees from seed always amazes me. In the fall as I collect the different types of acorns off the ground they seem so unassuming; just the litter from oak trees that many people complain about. I have to watch the trees for that exact right day or two that I can convince the squirrels to share as they dart through the canopy chattering their annoyance with me as their movements send more acorns to the ground.

  • December 21, 2011
    kelsay

    Small Mammals at Possibility Place Nursery

    Over the years we have had numerous employees, interns, clients, friends and even a couple of groupies. The amount of information, stories and studies that have come through our doors for discussion from these groups is quite staggering. We love this part of the job. I can not tell you how many times we’ve sat down with a prospective inquisitor of the natural world and shot the puck around. So to speak. Most of the time both sides come away with a better understanding of something. Then there are those times that we simply say “Huh?” We are always open to to these experiences and feel that they are crucial to a better understanding of nature. Its a big part of what we do.

  • September 08, 2011
    kelsay

    Night Life: Moths

    We’ve all done it as kids. Gone out after dark and collected fireflies in a jar or watched in scared fascination as a bat picked off moths drawn to their deaths by a street light. Those of us that lived in the sticks as kids also knew the sound of coyotes howling and the deafening clicking of thousands of katydids. The night life in and around our yards has always been an interest to most children if for no other reason than to scare ourselves by pretending that the noises were made by something far more terrifying than the right culprit. I guess I never grew out of that phase of my life.

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