Blog: Trees

 
  • August 02, 2018
    ppadmin

    Rate of Growth (Just a quick note)

    We recieved a call just the other day from a person looking for for a "fast growing" tree and that a smaller starter plant would be preferred. I offered up a Quercus muehlenbergii (Chinquapin Oak) and ran down the list of superlatives that made it why I'd plant that for his needs other than many others that might work for him. I was stopped half way through; "Woah, woah, woah. Oak trees don't grow fast. They're oaks. They grow slow. I want a sugar maple." After a brief exchange, I was left thinking about why people continue to think oaks grow slowly. So I thought I would post a very quick note.

    It has been our experience that many oak species grow as fast or faster than many of the maple species that they are so often replaced by. Our oaks grow at a rate of 30 to 48 inches or more in a given season, where our maples might give us half that number. 

  • October 02, 2017
    admin

    Small Window into using a Native or a Cultivar for Pollinators

    Several months ago I was talking to a friend of mine from the east coast, and we were discussing pollinators and the plant lists that seem to be leaping from every corner of the web from all kinds of sources. We both agreed that the whole idea of gardening for pollinators is a good thing and that the use of natives were improving, along with understanding of native plant needs and importance. But many of the sources included or were dominated by non-natives or cultivars.

  • September 12, 2016
    ppadmin

    Downers Grove Oak-tober event.

    The Downers Grove Park District will be giving away 70 one gallon oak trees from Possibility Place Nursery to start the celebration of Oaktober in Downers Grove. The trees will be given away to help celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Park District, and the initial Harvest Festival at Fishel Park on October 1, 2016. The species that have been choosen are Bur, White, Red, and Chinquapin Oaks. Please check with the Downers Grove Park District for further details on the event. And if you get an oak, give it some love and it'll grow great for you!

  • February 20, 2016
    ppadmin

    Yellow Birch

    One of my favorite trees in the winter is Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis). The bark is not white like white birch or yellow like the name would suggest, but cherry like that exfoliates with copper and gray with white lentils. The bark becomes brown and plated as it gets older.

  • December 05, 2012
    admin

    Possibility Place vs Conventional Planting with H.O.P.E.

    In November of 2012 we had students from the H.O.P.E. (Horticultural Occupational & Professional Experience) program visit Possibility Place. The focus of the program is to expose college age students to different aspects of the horticultural industry. They visit and work at a different nursery/garden center for two days a month for six months. It is hoped that at each stop they learn a little more about what it takes to be a plant professional.

  • October 20, 2012
    ppadmin

    Weather Adds to the Challenge

    Some of you may have read my post last fall about collecting acorns and all the idiosyncrasies of the different types of oaks as well as the other consumers I have to contend with to get my job as propagator done. Well, here I am starting my fourth year at Possibility Place Nursery and I have another set of circumstances to make my job more challenging and interesting: a too-mild winter followed by one of the driest springs and hottest summers on record.

  • April 04, 2011
    ppadmin

    The Above-grounds are Ready

    The new growth has harden off and the roots have filled out, making our above-ground trees and shrubs ready for orders and pick-up! Orders have already started coming in. So if you’d like to assure yourself a plant of a particular species, calling in sooner will increase the chances that we’ll have the it in stock. Stock is limited to the number of plants that we moved up in spring. The 2009 stock of above-ground plants look great, we even have a nice selection of Quercus alba (White Oak).