Blog: Home Landscaping

 
  • January 15, 2021
    stephanie

    Creating Color in the Shade with Native Plants

    For many, creating a colorful landscape in the shade can be a challenge.  Typical options are often limited to hostas, hostas, and more hostas!  While hostas certainly can serve a purpose filling in the north side of a garage or hugging a tree, they don’t offer much to enrich the color or texture of a landscape. Native plants offer a wide range of shapes, sizes and colors that thrive in the shade.  You can create a rich, layered, textured garden that offers color throughout the growing season while creating a healthy ecosystem for birds and insects by choosing from these native shade-lovers.

  • November 19, 2020
    kelsay

    Fall planting before winter grips us

    Though we’re late into the year and winter is creeping into view, it is never too early (or too late) to plant for next year. The soil is still a bit warm and it’s not cold quite yet, which makes for perfect dormant plant planting

  • March 28, 2020
    kelsay

    Some Changes Are on the Way

    Over the next week or so we will be updating our web site with slight changes and we would like to aplogize for any confusion that this might cause. We are efforting to make our e-commerce more intuitive and adding options. For the moment WE ARE SHIPPING TREES AND SHRUBS as of today. We are taking orders for forbs and grasses but the shipping for that will start May 15th. So anyone wishing to place orders on-line and have questions please call me at the office and I will help with more information.

  • October 02, 2017
    admin

    Small Window into using a Native or a Cultivar for Pollinators

    Several months ago I was talking to a friend of mine from the east coast, and we were discussing pollinators and the plant lists that seem to be leaping from every corner of the web from all kinds of sources. We both agreed that the whole idea of gardening for pollinators is a good thing and that the use of natives were improving, along with understanding of native plant needs and importance. But many of the sources included or were dominated by non-natives or cultivars.

  • April 19, 2016
    tristan

    What's That Pretty Weed?

    In 2003, I purchased my first money pit, a.k.a my home. I made it clear to my realtor that the house was secondary to the yard.  It had your normal cookie cutter landscape. You know, the kind with the circle and square shaped plants. The only plant left aone was a lovely white birch, which was a great selling point for me. I knew right then and there I could plant anything I wanted. Being the offspring of Connor Shaw, my first move was to bring nature back to earth.

  • March 04, 2016
    stephanie

    Milkweed, Monarchs and the Rest of the Pollinator Story

    When I first started as the lead propagator at Possibility Place Nursery, I learned one lesson very quickly: produce large amounts of milkweed.  There are great reasons behind this, both economic and environmental. For decades, Monarch populations have been on a major decline, and educated native plant enthusiasts want to help by planting milkweed.

  • June 24, 2013
    kelsay

    Large Breed Companion

    We often have customers visit the nursery and, most recently, bloggers who are planning landscaping projects but wonder how they’ll keep their large breed companions from destroying all their hard work.  I’m not an authority, but I would like to share some ideas that work for Lucy and I.

  • March 26, 2013
    kelsay

    Plant Sales, Pre-Order Dates and a Native Plant Class for 2013

    Possibility Place has just updated the News & Events page with 2013 dates for pre-orders and plant sales. We're also happy to announce our Forest Preserve District of DuPage County: Landscaping with Native Plants Class which will be held in Oak Brook on Saturday, April 20, from 1:30–3:30 PM.

  • December 05, 2012
    admin

    Possibility Place vs Conventional Planting with H.O.P.E.

    In November of 2012 we had students from the H.O.P.E. (Horticultural Occupational & Professional Experience) program visit Possibility Place. The focus of the program is to expose college age students to different aspects of the horticultural industry. They visit and work at a different nursery/garden center for two days a month for six months. It is hoped that at each stop they learn a little more about what it takes to be a plant professional.

  • October 20, 2012
    kelsay

    Weather Adds to the Challenge

    Some of you may have read my post last fall about collecting acorns and all the idiosyncrasies of the different types of oaks as well as the other consumers I have to contend with to get my job as propagator done. Well, here I am starting my fourth year at Possibility Place Nursery and I have another set of circumstances to make my job more challenging and interesting: a too-mild winter followed by one of the driest springs and hottest summers on record.

Pages