Blog

 
  • November 17, 2022
    mike

    Sign Up For Our Newsletter!!

    We're starting a newsletter! Starting in January we'll be sending updates on availability of online and retail native plants, in-person plant sales, planting tips, happenings on the farm and so much more! Sign up today!    
  • November 15, 2022
    mike

    Grants for Native Plants

    Are you planning a pollinator/ native garden, or would like to get trees planted in your neighborhood? We are excited to present this resource to make that effort a little bit easier, with this compilation of local, regional and national grants relevant to tree planting and native garden projects.    
  • October 21, 2022
    kelsay

    Using Natives in the Garden

    Our raison d'etre! Beginner's guide to help conceptualize using natives in your garden. Includes links to more resources.

  • October 18, 2022
    kelsay

    Fall planting before winter grips us

    Though we’re late into the year and winter is creeping into view, it is never too early (or too late) to plant for next year. The soil is still a bit warm and it’s not frozen quite yet, which makes for perfect dormant tree and shrub planting.

  • October 07, 2022
    mike

    Big News! We are now offering bulbs in our Online Store!

    We are pleased to announce we are now making Michigan Lily (Lilium michiganense) bulbs available for purchase online!

  • August 15, 2022
    mike

    Native Plant Sale Pop Up at Possibility Place Nursery

    By popular demand, Possibility Place Nursery will be hosting its first ever in person native plant sale!

    Join us on Friday August 26th, and Saturday August 27th at our nursery and farm in Monee, IL where you'll be able to select and purchase dozens of native perennial, tree and shrub species.
     

  • February 01, 2021
    kelsay

    Oaks Grow Slowly...NOT!

    We recieved a call just the other day from a person looking for for a "fast growing" tree and that a smaller starter plant would be preferred. I offered up a Quercus muehlenbergii (Chinquapin Oak) and ran down the list of superlatives that made it why I'd plant that for his needs other than many others that might work for him. I was stopped half way through; "Woah, woah, woah. Oak trees don't grow fast. They're oaks. They grow slow. I want a sugar maple." After a brief exchange, I was left thinking about why people continue to think oaks grow slowly. So I thought I would post a very quick note.

  • January 15, 2021
    stephanie

    Creating Color in the Shade with Native Plants

    For many, creating a colorful landscape in the shade can be a challenge.  Typical options are often limited to hostas, hostas, and more hostas!  While hostas certainly can serve a purpose filling in the north side of a garage or hugging a tree, they don’t offer much to enrich the color or texture of a landscape. Native plants offer a wide range of shapes, sizes and colors that thrive in the shade.  You can create a rich, layered, textured garden that offers color throughout the growing season while creating a healthy ecosystem for birds and insects by choosing from these native shade-lovers.

  • February 22, 2020
    kelsay

    There are no insect-free plants, but there are good insects - Our Butterfly List

    There are no insect-free plants, but there are good insects!

  • February 07, 2019
    stephanie

    Surviving Winter

    It’s cold outside today…like, really cold. And while our solution to keeping safe in these temperatures is simply not to engage, our plants just don’t have that option. From the cozy warmth of my insulated home, I gaze out at my perennial garden and think about the lush green plants that will begin to pop up in the spring. Year after year, they endure freezing temperatures and still manage to emerge in all their glory when the time is right.

    Part of the joy of planting native perennials is knowing that they are cold hardy to our climate zone. In Illinois, our cold hardiness zone is 6 for the northern part of the state and 5 for the southern half and the small area surrounding Lake Michigan. Native plants of our region have evolved to survive the harsh winters in these zones, but how exactly do they do that??

Pages