Latest Blog Posts

 
  • May 27, 2020
    ppadmin

    Due to COVID 19

    Due to COVID 19 and the fall out of the staffing under these conditions we are experiencing a stumble in our normal services and a lag in filling on-line orders. We are doing our best to hang in to get service and shipments to those of you that call. The high demand on our staff has slowed phone and email replies to an unacceptable level. We ask for your patience in all order and delivery matters as we have been stretched beyond our staffing. All is not gloom however, we have been steadily improving response times and orders that have been sent in both on-line and on the phone are being filled. If not just a bit later than we had planned. We will work hard to to regain our standing and plan on coming back stronger as the season rolls along. We would also like to thank all of you that have purchased from us. To any that are interested in placing an order please do not feel that we can not help. I assure you we can; it is just taking longer than is usual for us. Thank you all for your business, and we will strive to meet your native plant needs.

  • March 28, 2020
    ppadmin

    Some Changes Are on the Way

    Over the next week or so we will be updating our web site with slight changes and we would like to aplogize for any confusion that this might cause. We are efforting to make our e-commerce more intuitive and adding options. For the moment WE ARE SHIPPING TREES AND SHRUBS as of today. We are taking orders for forbs and grasses but the shipping for that will start May 15th. So anyone wishing to place orders on-line and have questions please call me at the office and I will help with more information.

  • February 07, 2019
    bshah

    Surviving Winter

    It’s cold outside today…like, really cold. And while our solution to keeping safe in these temperatures is simply not to engage, our plants just don’t have that option. From the cozy warmth of my insulated home, I gaze out at my perennial garden and think about the lush green plants that will begin to pop up in the spring. Year after year, they endure freezing temperatures and still manage to emerge in all their glory when the time is right.

    Part of the joy of planting native perennials is knowing that they are cold hardy to our climate zone. In Illinois, our cold hardiness zone is 6 for the northern part of the state and 5 for the southern half and the small area surrounding Lake Michigan. Native plants of our region have evolved to survive the harsh winters in these zones, but how exactly do they do that??

  • August 02, 2018
    ppadmin

    Rate of Growth (Just a quick note)

    We recieved a call just the other day from a person looking for for a "fast growing" tree and that a smaller starter plant would be preferred. I offered up a Quercus muehlenbergii (Chinquapin Oak) and ran down the list of superlatives that made it why I'd plant that for his needs other than many others that might work for him. I was stopped half way through; "Woah, woah, woah. Oak trees don't grow fast. They're oaks. They grow slow. I want a sugar maple." After a brief exchange, I was left thinking about why people continue to think oaks grow slowly. So I thought I would post a very quick note.

    It has been our experience that many oak species grow as fast or faster than many of the maple species that they are so often replaced by. Our oaks grow at a rate of 30 to 48 inches or more in a given season, where our maples might give us half that number.